Bowls


BOWLS-LATE (Straight Line Border)

Description: These are 7 later 19th Century-early 20th Century bowls that have the more primitive straight line borders not rain cloud borders. They have less carefully painted Canton scenes than the earlier bowls. The porcelain is thin and all the bottoms are glazed. They range from a 4 1/4" diameter handleless teacup (marked "CHINA") to the largest 10 3/8" diameter bowl. They weigh from 5 oz. to 2 lbs. 14 oz. The middle picture shows all the bowls stacked together.

BOWLS-OCTAGONAL 6 1/4" (Berry Bowls, Early Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  The two octagonal Berry Bowls or fruit/sauce dishes pictured here are rare and are the only ones we have ever seen or heard about. They are 6 1/4" wide (flat side to flat side) x 1 1/4" deep. As with all early Canton plates they are very attractive in their primitive painting. Both have glazed bottoms and rain cloud borders. 

BOWLS-PUNCH

Description:  Highly prized when they can be found are these Punch Bowls. The larger they are the more expensive they are. The largest shown here is 16 1/8" in diameter, note that it is marked "China" on the bottom (exported after 1890). Herbert Schiffer said punch bowls go as large as 20" and that bowls larger than 16" "are extremely rare". The smallest here is 10".

BOWLS-Round 6" (Berry Bowl, Early Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  The three round Berry Bowls or fruit/sauce dishes pictured here are rare. These are representative examples and range from 5 5/8" in diameter to 6 1/4" and 1 1/8" deep to 1 1/4".  As with all early Canton plates they are very attractive in their primitive painting. All have glazed bottoms and rain cloud borders.

BOWLS-SHAVING

Description:  Probably unique in the Canton pattern, Shaving Bowls were exported to Europe as early as the 1730s in other patterns. Shaving bowls have a wide rim from which a semi-circular piece is removed. Thus, the bowl is held up to one's throat as the person shaves or is shaved by a barber. We believe most of them were oval but some round ones probably were also made. 

BOWLS-SOUP (Tiny Scallops, Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  An unusual bowl because of its grayish cast and thin sides. The unsophisticated decoration points to a late manufacturing date. The bowl has 8 very slight scallops and they are hard to see in the pictures. There is no outside decoration but the inside has the rain cloud border and the typical Canton scene.

BOWLS-SOUP 10" (Early Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  Soup Bowls in perfect condition are very scarce compared to 10" dinner plates. They range in diameter from 9 3/4" to 10 3/8" and we consider that they must be at least 1 1/2" deep to differentiate them from shallower dinner plates. The 3 soup bowls pictured are a representative sample. On the left is the deepest bowl 10" x 1 3/4" deep, in the middle is the largest diameter bowl 10 3/8" x 1 5/8" deep, and on the right is a 9 3/4" x 1 1/2" example.

BOWLS-SOUP 8 5/8" (Early Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  Medium size Soup Bowls in perfect condition are very scarce to rare compared to similar size luncheon plates. The soups range in diameter from 8 1/2" to 8 7/8" and 1 1/2" to 1 5/8" deep. We consider that they must be at least 1 1/2" deep to differentiate them from luncheon plates, which are 7/8"-1 1/4" deep. The 3 soup bowls pictured are a representative sample. As with all early Canton plates they are very attractive with their primitive painting.

BOWLS-SOUP-8 7/8"-"CHINA" (Late Rain Cloud Border)

Description:  These Soup Bowls are unusual and rare. They are marked "CHINA" which means they were made after 1890 yet they have rain cloud borders instead of the straight line borders of this late era. This indicates that rain cloud border Canton was still being made after 1890.

They range in diameter from 8 5/8" to 8 7/8" and from 1 1/2" to 1 5/8" deep. The 2 "CHINA" bowls pictured are a representative sample. These late bowls have glazed bottoms and are made of thin porcelain.

BOWLS-SOUP-LATE-8 1/2" (Straight Line Border)

Description:  These late Soup Bowls are quite scarce and desirable. They are 8 1/2" in diameter and 1 5/8" to 1 3/4" deep. The 2 soup bowls pictured are a representative sample. All of these late soup bowls have glazed bottoms, are made of thinner porcelain and have straight-line borders.